Uterine Fibroids and vaginal infections

Uterine Fibroids and vaginal infections

Many women have encountered some sort of vaginal yeast infection or even battled with a case of uterine fibroids.  For the yeast infection; a fungus called candida which is also a natural resident in the intestines and vagina, an area that shouldn’t be imbalanced, but if so, can lead to discharge, itching, swelling, to your general discomfort.  Most cases of yeast infections have increased due to antibiotics which destroy beneficial natural flora found in the vagina and allow more harmful bacteria or yeast to multiply.  Trichomoniasis is another common vaginal infection as is chlamydia which can be passed to a baby during childbirth and cause blindness.

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Making Homegrown Medicinals

Preparedness – Homegrown Medicinals

Homegrown Medicinals @ Common Sense Homesteading

While I’m out working in the garden, I’m not just tending standard food crops, I’m also tending herbs and “weeds”.  Some I use for culinary purposes, some for medicinal, some for both.  (Don’t you love it when you can get multiple uses from one item?)  With many medicinal herbs now being outlawed in Europe, and increasing odds that the US is likely to follow Europe’s lead (thank you, Big Pharma), I’ve been learning more about plants that I can grow in my own yard for medicinal purposes.  You’d be surprised at how useful “weeds” can be.

I dry an assortment of plants over the course of the season.  Most of them live in my pantry in glass jars covered with my husband’s old mismatched dress socks to keep out the light.  I cut each sock in half so it can cover two jars.  The socks are elasticized so they grip the jars nicely.  I always hated throwing one sock out when the other got worn through – now I have a use for them.  The food in front of them is kept in bins that can be easily pulled out to access the herbs.  You can see part of a bin on the right hand side of the photo.

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Medicinal Herbal Tinctures & extracts 

extracts on

 

DIY Making Natural Cough Syrups!

How to Make Medicinal Syrups

How to Make Medicinal Syrups

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Medicinal syrups are a great way to administer not so pleasant tasting herbs to young ones and bothered adults alike, or a great way to let your favorite herbs come to life in beverages and food dishes. Finding a nice combination of a pleasant aromatic herb and a medicinal herb can leave you with a tasty concoction perfect for many occasions and recipes! Herbal syrups make great additions to teas, desserts, bubbly beverages and cocktails, or all on their own by the spoonful!

Syrups can be prepared with sugar or honey. If prepared with honey, my preferred method, medicinal syrup can be soothing and coating to the digestive tract membranes it comes into contact with, such as the throat. Besides being absolutely great for you, who doesn’t love a good honey coat when it’s cold outside? For proper preservation and a shelf stable syrup, it is recommended to use a ratio of 1:1 (tea to honey). However, you can cut back to 2:1 or 3:1. If you use less sweetener to tea parts, you will need to keep your syrup refrigerated and use quickly. You can also add some tincture to help preserve your syrup longer, as well as give an extra medicinal boost.

The best thing about syrups is that like tea or tinctures, you can formulate with any combination of herbs to create medicine for your needs. While elderberry syrup is the most popular, I also love to have individual or combinations of ginger, thyme, elecampane, chamomile, peppermint, marshmallow root, schisandra berry, echinacea root, elder flower, hawthorn berry, holy basil, and hop flower syrups around!

How to Make Medicinal Syrups

Ingredients

These two ingredients are good for helping with the mild mood changes we all experience from time to time. This syrup goes great drizzled on top of dessert, spooned into tea or hot toddies, or taken by the spoonful throughout the day.

Directions

  • First make a very strong decoction, using 1 oz of herb per 16 oz of water. Warm over low heat, bring to a simmer, cover partially, and reduce the liquid down to half the original volume.
  • When you have 8 oz of liquid, add 8 oz of honey.
  • Warm the mixture over low heat, stirring well. *Do not heat above 110 degrees.*
  • Optional: Add 1 part tincture or brandy to 3 parts syrup for a medicinal boost and longer shelf life.
  • Pour syrup into bottles and label. Store in the refrigerator, where it will last for up to six months. You can find the cork top glass bottles that I used right HERE. They are wonderful syrup vessels!

Medicinal Syrup

Read at>>http://mountainroseblog.com/homemade-medicinal-syrups/#comment-250882

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